Add ova file as VM on Linux with libvirt (Qemu)

Although the commands are very simple and just 2-3 steps but I keep forgetting them and hence wrote the following script:

The script takes input as “ova” filename and then creates the qcow2 image and finally a VM for you.

#!/bin/bash - 
#===============================================================================
#
#          FILE: ova2vm.sh
# 
#         USAGE: ./ova2vm.sh 
# 
#   DESCRIPTION: 
# 
#       OPTIONS: ---
#  REQUIREMENTS: ---
#          BUGS: ---
#         NOTES: ---
#        AUTHOR: Amit Agarwal (aka), 
#  ORGANIZATION: Mobileum
#       CREATED: 12/28/2017 13:59
# Last modified: Thu Dec 28, 2017  02:17PM
#      REVISION:  ---
#===============================================================================

set -o nounset                              # Treat unset variables as an error

if [[ $# == 0 ]]
then
    echo "You need to provide ova/vmdk filename"
    exit
fi
if [[ $1 == *ova ]]
then
    tmp=$(mktemp -d /tmp/amitXXXXXXX)
    cd  $tmp
    tar xvf $1
    file=$(echo $PWD/*vmdk)
else
    file=$1
    echo "Not a OVA file"
fi
dfile="$dest/$(basename $file)"

read -p "Enter the name for VM" vmname
qemu-img convert $file $dfile -p -c -O qcow2
virt-install --disk $dfile --ram 512 \
    --virt-type kvm --vcpus 1 --name "$vmname" --import

Better windows VM experience on Qemu

With Qemu resize and copy-paste option,  Windows VM seems to be lacking all this. This can be fixed by installing the spice tools in Windows VM. To do this, head over to spice space and download the tool and enjoy your better VM experience.

Fix display size on libvirt/Qemu guest

Lot of times I find myself of VM that does not correctly resize the screen display and that is literally nuisance. So, here is quick and dirty fix for this.

First you need to find out information about your display with following command:

xrandr -q

And you will see output like this:

Screen 0: minimum 320 x 200, current 1920 x 1080, maximum 8192 x 8192
Virtual-0 connected primary 1920×1080+0+0 0mm x 0mm
1024×768      59.92 +
1920×1200     59.88
1920×1080     59.96*
1600×1200     59.87
1680×1050     59.95
1400×1050     59.98
1280×1024     59.89
1440×900      59.89
1280×960      59.94
1280×854      59.89
1280×800      59.81
1280×720      59.86
1152×768      59.78
800×600       59.86
848×480       59.66
720×480       59.71
640×480       59.38
Virtual-1 disconnected
Virtual-2 disconnected
Virtual-3 disconnected

This tells you the currently configured screens and the resolutions. In my case, the only connected screen as seen above is “Virtual-0“. Now, time to do the magic.

You just need to set the correct display/screen size with following command:

xrandr --output Virtual-0 --mode 1920x1200

Also, if you need to add a new resolution, first you need to create a modeline with following command:

cvt 1200 1024

You will get output like :

# 1200×1024 59.82 Hz (CVT) hsync: 63.59 kHz; pclk: 101.75 MHz
Modeline “1200x1024_60.00”  101.75  1200 1280 1400 1600  1024 1027 1037 1063 -hsync +vsync

 

and then set that with:

xrandr --output Virtual-0 --mode 1200x1024

Hope this helps you do away with some really pathetic display sizes in VM 🙂