Music players on Linux – the poor mans random song player.

If you have more applications running on your system then your system can handle them then you know what I mean when I say that the Music Players take a lot of CPU. Otherwise harmless, but when you are doing too many things, then lot of times you would feel that probably stopping the Music player might help. But then Linux is all about alternatives. So, there is a command line player called mpg123, which does not use so much CPU. But what about playlist 🙂

playlist="/tmp/playlist"
(find . -type f |sort -R) > $playlist
trap exit INT TERM EXIT 1 2 3 15
while read line
do
    mpg123 "$line"
done < $playlist

Just copy this to somewhere as .sh file or just type this in your directory of choice and it will play all the music in that folder in random order without hogging your CPU.

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unable to browse windows network with samba4

I use Fedora 17 on my work laptop and thus need to connect to windows share sometimes. After I upgraded to Fedora 17 some time, I was unable to browse the windows network. I would get all kind of errors and warnings and tried everything that I knew about Samba to fix the issue. Tried searching through all the forums to figure out what was wrong but nothing helped. And suddenly today I resolved it and guess how:

Samba4 packages still are not able to mount the windows shares.

So, the solution was simple, remove samba 4 and go back to samba 3 current version in the repos. That sounded easy, until I started doing it. There are lot of dependencies on the samba-client so unless you are ready to remove them all and add them again, it’s not going to be that easy. Finally I had to do it the old fashioned way, using rpm command rather that yum, and here is how I did it:

rpm -e --nodeps samba4*
sudo yum install samba*

Since, I wanted all the samba4 packages to go away so removed them all at one go and then added the samba packages with yum :).

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quadkonsole – multiple consoles to make your life easier

First lets install quadkonsole:

yum install quadkonsole

Now, to launch the quadkonsole, just type quadkonsole in the run box (appears with Alt+F2).

You will by default see 4 console windows in single window but you can change that with command line options like so:

quadkonsole --rows 4 --columns 4

This will initiate windows with 16 consoles. How cool is that.

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