terminal, terminal everywhere.

Tilda is a borderless terminal that can be started multiple times each with its own configuration.

Name        : tilda
Arch        : x86_64
Epoch       : 0
Version     : 1.2.4
Release     : 1.fc23
Size        : 344 k
Repo        : @System
From repo   : fedora
Summary     : A Gtk based drop down terminal for Linux and Unix
URL         : http://github.com/lanoxx/tilda
License     : GPLv2+
Description : Tilda is a Linux terminal taking after the likeness of many classic terminals
: from first person shooter games, Quake, Doom and Half-Life (to name a few),
: where the terminal has no border and is hidden from the desktop until a key is
: pressed.


Its super easy to have multiple configurations. Start as many as you want. Preferences dialog automaticallly pops up when you start first time and then just configure the terminal to your needs.

How to verify sha256sum for multiple file or one file.

So, lets say you have downloaded the SHA256SUMS files. This file contains the sha256sum for multiple files and you want to compare the values for only one or some of them, then the simplest thing you can do is:

sha256sum -c SHA256SUMS

Now, with this if you do not have some files present then you might get some errors and if you do not want that, then you can try this:

grep <filename> SHA256SUMS|tee /proc/self/fd/2|sha256sum --check -

And now if you have some files under some subdirectories as well and you want to generate the SHA256SUMS file, then the simplest is to use this:

sha256sum $(find . -type f -exec echo {} \+ )
sha256sum $(find . -type f)

Get count of lines in scripts (shell)

If you have tried to get the count of lines in file, the you would know about “nl” or “wc -l”. But as you are aware these give you number of lines with other details as well and you need to post process the number to make sure that you have only number and nothing else. In such cases, it is useful to use the count feature of grep and here is a shorthand to get the count of lines in any shell script:

lines=$(grep -c . <filename>)